Review: House of Earth and Blood by Sarah J Maas

Alexis:

“Through love, all is possible.”

Maas has a way of writing worlds that suck you in and make you want to keep reading. While this world is pretty similar to the one in ACOTAR, I loved how the world in Crescent City blends modern technology with magic; we don’t get enough fantasy with modern technology, and it was really interesting and fun to see the characters use both cell phones and magic. It was also loosely based off of Ancient Rome, which was cool.

I really enjoyed all of the characters. I liked reading from both Bryce and Hunt’s perspective. They both have a great mix of admirable traits and flaws. And, as usual, Maas is great at writing characters who have suffered from trauma with care.

The first half of this book did a great job setting up the world, the characters’ backstories, and establishing the main plot, while the second half was more fast paced and action packed. While a lot of readers find Maas’ build up slow, I enjoy how she spends time establishing the world and letting us know the characters before diving deeper into the plot. And I thought the plot of this book was intricate. Honestly, even though this book is so heavy on the details and it took me a while the get all the worldbuilding details straight, it was just so much fun to read!

My cons are pretty small. First, let me just say that if you don’t like Maas’ writing style, just don’t pick up the book? A lot of people seem to be giving this book bad reviews without even reading it because they aren’t fans of Maas’ writing.

I will say, thankfully, this book has considerably less drawn out sex scenes; it still has a decent amount of people flipping each other people off, and a lot of f-bombs, which didn’t bother me. I’m still not a fan of her character name choices (Bryce and Hunt? And I never got over Tamlin’s name from ACOTAR) but honestly, that’s such a small bone to pick, and it boils down to personal preference.

Even though I loved reading the ACOTAR series, I thought this book was far better written. I still don’t think her writing is the absolute best, but what she IS good at is writing characters you will want to root for, and writing worlds that you will become obsessed with. And despite the fact that this book is over 800 pages long, I barely wanted to take any breaks from reading it.

Bottom line: this was so much to fun to read! And considering the fact that the plot centers around a murder mystery, apparently murder mysteries are my new definition of “fun.”

VERDICT: 📚📚📚📚📚

 

Review: Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

Alexis:

Good Omens is a satirical book about the Apocalypse. When a demon named Crowley realizes he’s misplaced the Antichrist, an eleven-year-old boy named Adam, he teams up with his old enemy turned friend, an angel named Aziraphale. Together, they try to find Adam so that they can save Earth before the Apocalypse starts.

While I really enjoyed this book, I didn’t love it. I did love the beginning. The writing is brilliant and satirical, and it makes fun of everything. The book is full of religious scripture and religious references. Every line is witty, out there, and full of British humor.

I really enjoyed reading about Crowley and Aziraphale, and I wish that the majority of the book was from their point of view. I did like reading about the Four Horsemen, but some of the other characters were tedious to read about. My biggest complaint with the book is that there is a huge cast of characters, and the book jumps around a lot. It’s also a little too slow-paced.

If you like Supernatural, the two share a lot of names and qualities. I’m excited to watch the Good Omens show on Amazon Prime, however; I think it will come across really well on screen!

VERDICT: 3.5 stars